Adiabatic Quantum Computing with Spin Qubits Hosted by Molecules

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., accepted.
DOI:10.1039/C4CP04744C 
A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, comparing with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: One is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing electron spin resonance/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown that much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

Graphical abstract: Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules

Updated: December 17, 2014 — 5:43 pm